Devotion

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Deborah embodies love, loyalty, and enthusiasm for those who have developmental disabilities. She has devoted her time, talent and treasures to establish opportunities for those with autism spectrum disorder, so that they can have a viable path to a productive and meaningful future. She has cast a vision that is changing the face of our community through a profound initiative that is opening doors for these families.

Succeed at home first. Seek and merit divine help. Never compromise with honesty. Remember the people involved. Hear both sides before judging. Obtain counsel of others. Defend those who are absent. Be sincere yet decisive. Develop one new proficiency a year. Plan tomorrow’s work today. Hustle while you wait. Maintain a positive attitude. Keep a sense of humor. Be orderly in person and in work. Do not fear mistakes –fear only the absence of creative, constructive, and corrective responses to those mistakes. Facilitate the success of subordinates. Listen twice as much as you speak. Keep it simple. Keep it honest. Keep it real.

Whether at church, in the community, with family and friends or at work, Deborah is continually evaluating the situation and how to make it better. And it shows. She has established a long list of legacies. From those in our community with autism who now have programs that assist in growth to the 7th grade girls group that she mentors, Deborah gives that with which she has been blessed, eternal compassion. She says, "you cannot leave a rock unturned because you never know who may need an extra hand in moving it."

Her enthusiasm. You can hear it in her voice and see it on her face. When she is working with or speaking to others about a project or a situation, she literally feels what others are experiencing.

Autism affects 1 in 45 children. Families struggle most with just integrating their families into the community, that's where FEAT of Louisville has voiced their mission. "To ease the autism journey..." Families need specific programs, training, and integration. Being a small nonprofit, $50k could allow FEAT to truly make a difference in the lives of thousands of kids and young adults. Sadly, autism is our future and FEAT stands ready and able to work with these individuals to learn to speak, learn appropriate social skills and learn skills that will enable them to one day have a meaningful future through employment.

Deborah gives every ounce of her being to this organization and to this special needs community. To be able to "reward" her tireless efforts and touch a child's life would have to be the most wonderful possibility ever.

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